Thailande, la vidéo qui démange les biens pensants

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

Thailande, la vidéo qui démange les biens pensants

Message  Admin le Jeu 13 Oct 2011 - 7:24



BANGKOK: At last Thai people have something to talk about other than divisive politics or street protests.
She is Nong Ja, a 20-year-old student whose song about an itchy ear has taken the country by storm, attracting a staggering 16 million hits on YouTube, along with 100,000 ''likes'' on her Facebook page.
Ms Ja is Thailand's hottest act at the moment. Her photo has been on the front pages of newspapers, television stations flood her with invitations, and she has stage appearance bookings well into 2012.

But Ms Ja's performances have outraged social conservatives in the predominantly Buddhist nation and prompted many complaints to the Ministry of Culture, which is considering the matter.
Having an itchy ear is a Thai idiom which means somebody is talking about you, not unlike Western people saying their ears are burning.
The trouble is that in her performance the scantily clad Ms Ja does not confine the itch to her ear as one of her hands goes towards a more intimate part of her body.
Her critics say little is left to the imagination.
The song also has obvious puns that some might regard as lewd word plays more suited to a late night comedy show.
As the song quickly became Thailand's most popular - you hear it in taxis, in restaurants, in tuk-tuks and even on motorbike taxis - Ms Ja was accused of all sorts of things, including being a prostitute, which she is not.
Ms Ja has not handled the criticism well, although the negative attention has not curtailed her public appearances.
Asked by one breathless interviewer how she could do something like that on stage, Ms Ja answered tearfully: ''I come from a poor family.
''If I could choose I would not choose this life.''
The controversy is similar to one that raged in Indonesia in 2002 about dangdut dancer Inul Daratista, whose suggestive hip movements known as the ''drill'' outraged Muslim conservatives.
They called for Ms Daratista's performances to be banned and prompted the drafting of anti-pornography legislation.

source http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/steamy-performance-lands-latest-thai-pop-sensation-in-hot-water-20111003-1l5bo.html







Fact of the week:
Democrat vote in July 3 election: 11,433,762
YouTube views of Turbo Music’s Khan Huu: 11,997,951

Source: New Mandala statistics division

The decision by Thai band Turbo Music to place a video of their hit song Khan Huu on Youtube in early June has had unexpected, but probably not unwelcome, consequences.

Almost 12 million hits later (and climbing by the day), the video has sparked another skirmish in modern Thailand’s culture wars.

What’s the controversy all about?

The song itself is a tale of a young lady with an itchy ear (khan huu, คันหู) that won’t go away. Packed with double-entendre (and invitations for vowel substitution), the song relates her quest for relief: she has tried a cotton-bud, but to no avail (เอาสำลี มาปั่น ก็ไม่หาย). Perhaps the itch was caused by some water getting in when she was showering washing her hair (อาบน้ำ สระหัว น้ำคงเข้า). She asks her mother for something to fix it (แม่จ๋า หายา ให้หนูหน่อย). The singer explains that when she was a child it didn’t ever itch (ตอนเด็กๆ ไม่เคยคันซักที) but it started just two or three years after she became a young woman (พอเริ่มเป็นสาว ได้แค่สองสามปี หูก็เริ่มมี อาการ คันคัน). If anyone can give her a cure, she will give them anything. She will drink it or inject it (once or twice if necessary) so long as it is good medicine (จะกินฉีด ขอให้เป็นยาดี จะลองให้ฉีด ยาสักทีสองที ถ้ายาเค้าดี หูคงหายคัน).

There is nothing particularly startling here; rather obvious puns, but all good fun. The song seems very typical of the lewd word play that is popular in so many entertainment contexts in Thailand (and in many other places: think of Grace Jones singing “pull up to my bumper in your long black limousine”).

The trouble is that the singer’s performance in the video leaves nothing to even the most challenged imagination. The singer is 20-year-old Nong Ja (นงผณี มหาดไทย – interesting surname!), a student from Suphanburi, with 100 thousand likes on her Facebook page.

In the video she makes it very clear from that outset that her difficulties are not aural. Her vocalisation, her dress, her dancing and her distinctive hand actions focus attention squarely on another part of her body. It probably would have been a much more entertaining performance if the stage show was more subtle. But that wouldn’t have attracted more than 11 million YouTube views.

The video is available here. Be warned, don’t watch it if you are offended by a performance that many have condemned as being inappropriate.

Provocative dancing by young women has makes some guardians of Thai culture very concerned indeed, whether the offenders are professional Coyote girls at temple festivals in Nong Khai, or songkran amateurs in Bangkok. This latest public display of feminine sexuality has prompted complaints to the Ministry of Culture, talk of restricting inappropriate public performances in the provinces, and possible ICT intervention to have the video removed. There is vigorous debate among the YouTube viewers about the merits of Nong Ja’s performance.

Some of this discussion reflects standard concerns about appropriate female behaviour, and the dangers of setting bad examples for children and young adults. The fact that Nong Ja is a student—pictured demurely in her uniform on Facebook—seems to be a cause of both alarm and delight. There are also the classic differences of opinion about whether such performances are an assertive and confident display of female sexuality or just more-of-the-same pandering to men’s desires for commercial ends.

One interesting angle on this debate of this is Nong Ja’s appearance on the television talk-show hosted by the supercilious Woody. Woody was obviously happy to cash in on the interest generated by the controversial video and included a very toned down performance of the song at the beginning of the show. But as the interview proceeded, his disapproval was all too evident, prompting many on-line followers to jump to Nong Ja’s defence.

Woody featured on New Mandala a few months ago when he interviewed Princess Chulaphon, whose YouTube following seems rather less enthusiastic than Nong Ja’s. For those interested in the politics of language and body language, it would make a fascinating study to compare Woody’s treatment of Princess Chulaphon with his treatment of Nong Ja.

With Nong Ja, Woody was direct and confrontational, wondering out loud if she was a prostitute.

I don’t recall any tough questioning in his earlier interview.

The on-line and media skirmish promoted by Nong Ja is a good illustration of the tendency for narrowly defined notions of national culture to unravel at the edges. Those who attempt to create, and enforce, a notion of an appropriate national culture are involved in a never-ending project of selection, refinement, censorship and creation. Even the most elite culture is an extraordinary mishmash that is full of subaltern, foreign and entirely invented elements. It’s simply impossible to regulalate a process as dynamic as cultural production.

Promoting a national culture was probably considerably easier in the pre-internet era when mainstream media mainly conveyed information and values from the centre outwards, from Bangkok to the provinces. But the internet provides for a much more unruly and decentralised flow of ideas and performances, challenging the pre-eminence of the moral centre. That’s exactly why Woody and others seem so anxious about the dangers of the on-line world. Not only can the red contagion invade the streets and shopping malls of Bangkok, but their provincial lust can contaminate the hearts and minds of middle-class youth.



Khan Huu

อู๊ย…คันหู
ไม่รู้ ว่าเป็นอะไร
เอาสำลี มาปั่น ก็ไม่หาย
คันจริ๊ง มันคันอยู่ข้างใน
คันหูทีไร ขนลุก ทุกที
.อาบน้ำ สระหัว น้ำคงเข้า
หนูก็เอา สำลีปั่น อย่างดี
ปั่นจนแห้ง ก็ยังคันอยู่ดี
จะหลับจะนอน
มันจี๊ดจ๊าดเหลือที
คันหูทุกที ขนลุกขนชัน..
อู๊ย…คันหู
ไม่รู้ ว่าเป็นอะไร
เอาสำลี มาปั่น ก็ไม่หาย
คันจริ๊ง มันคันอยู่ข้างใน
คันหูทีไร ขนลุก ทุกที
.แม่จ๋า หายา ให้หนูหน่อย
ไม่งั้น ต้องคอย
คันอยู่ อย่างนี้.
ตอนเด็กๆ ไม่เคยคันซักที
พอเริ่มเป็นสาว
ได้แค่สองสามปี
หูก็เริ่มมี อาการ คันคัน..
อู๊ย…คันหู
ไม่รู้ ว่าเป็นอะไร
เอาสำลี มาปั่น ก็ไม่หาย
คันจริ๊ง มันคันอยู่ข้างใน
คันหูทีไร ขนลุก ทุกที
.หากใคร รักษา ให้หายได้
จะเอาอะไร จะยกให้ ทันที
จะกินฉีด ขอให้เป็นยาดี
จะลองให้ฉีด ยาสักทีสองที
ถ้ายาเค้าดี หูคงหายคัน
แม่จ๋า หายา ให้หนูหน่อย
ไม่งั้น ต้องคอย
คันอยู่ อย่างนี้.
ตอนเด็กๆ ไม่เคยคันซักที
พอเริ่มเป็นสาว
ได้แค่สองสามปี
หูก็เริ่มมี อาการ คันคัน..
อู๊ย…คันหู
ไม่รู้ ว่าเป็นอะไร
เอาสำลี มาปั่น ก็ไม่หาย
คันจริ๊ง มันคันอยู่ข้างใน
คันหูทีไร ขนลุก ทุกที
.หากใคร รักษา ให้หายได้
จะเอาอะไร จะยกให้ ทันที
จะกินฉีด ขอให้เป็นยาดี
จะลองให้ฉีด ยาสักทีสองที
ถ้ายาเค้าดี หูคงหายคัน


source http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/newmandala/2011/09/14/%E0%B8%84%E0%B8%B1%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%AB%E0%B8%B9-nong-ja-ahead-of-democrats/


Dernière édition par Admin le Sam 21 Juil 2012 - 22:26, édité 1 fois
avatar
Admin
Admin

Messages : 4881
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2009

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Thailande, la vidéo qui démange les biens pensants

Message  Admin le Ven 14 Oct 2011 - 6:29


La chanteuse Ja dans le collimateur des moralistes.

La culture thaïlandaise serait-elle en en train de sombrer ? Les parangons de vertu en sont convaincus face au buzz sans égal provoqué par Ja, la chanteuse du groupe Turbo, et ses mimiques on ne peut plus suggestives.

Tendez l’oreille et vous entendrez ces jours-ci les craquements de la culture thaïlandaise qui, tout autour de vous, est en train de s’effondrer. Le pays est sous le choc d’une chanson pop qui mortifie les plus conservateurs. Et pourtant il ne s’agit que d’oreilles qui démangent. Oui, d’oreilles qui démangent ! L’histoire a commencé il y a deux ans quand est sorti un tube inoffensif intitulé Khan Hoo, “les oreilles qui démangent”, interprété par Nok Archareeya, reprenant ainsi une expression thaïe qui signifie que quelqu’un parle de vous. C’est l’équivalent d’“avoir les oreilles qui sifflent”, à ceci près que les Thaïlandais, préfèrent le terme “démanger”. Ephémère, le tube a été en quelque sorte la Macarena de l’année. Il serait passé aux oubliettes si, voilà trois mois, un groupe baptisé Turbo ne l’avait pas ressuscité… mais en allant un peu plus loin.

La chanteuse du groupe, Ja, est une fille sexy dont le short est si court qu’en comparaison celui de [la chanteuse australienne] Kylie Minogue ressemble à un chapiteau de cirque. Les myopes peuvent certainement être enclins à penser qu’elle est nue au dessous de la taille. En interprétant la chanson sur les oreilles qui démangent, elle entreprend, en se pavanant sur scène, de caresser le devant de son minuscule short… si vous voyez ce que je veux dire. Et si vous ne voyez pas, le pays, lui, l’a vu. Le mot oreille en thaï n’est guère éloigné d’un terme très cru en argot qui désigne les organes génitaux d’une femme. En caressant son short, Ja envoyait un message on ne peut plus clair : une partie de son corps la démangeait et ce n’était pas son système auditif.

C’est le genre de blagues grossières qui circulent dans les cafés-théâtres à des heures avancées de la nuit. Le problème, c’est que quelqu’un a filmé la performance et l’a mise sur YouTube pour que tout le pays puisse la voir, y compris les jeunes qui regardaient, les yeux écarquillés, en se grattant les oreilles. Ce clip a “officiellement” scandalisé la nation. A ce jour, il totalise 16 millions de visionnages sur YouTube, ce qui donne à penser qu’il y a autant d’indignation que de curiosité dans le pays. L’outrage a propulsé Ja, son short et son groupe à la une de tous les journaux du pays. Son clip a même fait un tabac à la télévision, même si sa main avait été floutée quand elle frotte son entrejambe, ce qui rend la chose encore plus érotique. Ja a été invitée à des talk-shows ; elle avait l’air d’une biche sous les projecteurs et elle s’est dite profondément désolée. “Comment une femme, une Thaïlandaise, peut-elle faire quelque chose comme ça sur scène ?” lui a récemment demandé un journaliste, fébrile. Ja, les larmes aux yeux, lui a répondu : “Je viens d’une famille pauvre. Si j’avais eu le choix, je n’aurais pas mené cette vie.”

Les oreilles qui démangent… Les bien-pensants, indignés, craignent la fin prochaine de leur culture. Mais, en vérité, on ne compte que deux chansons dans la longue, longue histoire de la musique pop qui ont été jugées scandaleuses pour le public. En 2005, l’actrice Sinjai Hongthai a interprété un morceau intitulé J’aime son mari. Et le chanteur folk Chai Muangsing a sorti Ma femme a un amant. Une tendance jugée pour le moins dérangeante. Les deux titres ont été interdits par le ministère de la Culture, qui a décrété qu’ils allaient à l’encontre de la culture du pays, car une Thaïlandaise honnête ne peut aimer en secret le mari d’une autre.

Plus grave encore, écouter ces chansons pourrait encourager “l’infidélité conjugale”. Et pour bien montrer qu’il ne plaisantait pas, le ministère en a banni une troisième, intitulée Une femme, deux hommes. J’ai été surpris. Pas par les morceaux eux-mêmes, mais par le fait que des chansons puissent avoir un tel effet sur le psychisme thaïlandais. Au bout du compte, le ministère de la Culture devrait se concentrer davantage sur la qualité des chansons pop plutôt que sur la propension de certaines d’entre elles à porter atteinte à la culture. Branchez-vous par exemple sur la radio Hotwave et forcez-vous à écouter une heure de pop thaïlandaise. Placez tous les objets tranchants hors de votre portée de peur de craquer. Nul doute que la banalité de cette musique soit nettement plus nocive pour la culture thaïlandaise qu’une fille en train de s’amuser sur scène avec son public ivre. Quant à Ja, il ne faut pas trop s’inquiéter pour elle. Rien de tel que de la mauvaise publicité : elle a des concerts programmés jusqu’en 2012. La rumeur court désormais que son prochain single s’intitulera Itchy Feet [Les pieds qui démangent]. Pernicieux ? Non, tant que ce ne sont pas les pieds du mari d’une autre.


REPÈRE Lutte de classes

“Y a-t-il réellement des filles dans votre genre dans notre société ?” L’animateur télé Woody Milintachinda a mis sur le gril la chanteuse Ja le 4 septembre. Pour l’universitaire Pavin Chachavalpongpun, qui a livré une tribune au vitriol dans The Nation, pas de doute : le présentateur s’est fait le porte-parole des élites et le défenseur de la moralité. “Mais si la Thaïlande est le pays de la moralité, pourquoi notre industrie du sexe est-elle si prospère ? Est-ce parce que ce commerce procure des bénéfices colossaux aux riches et puissants des classes supérieures ?”


source http://www.courrierinternational.com/article/2011/10/13/la-chanson-qui-demange-les-bien-pensants
avatar
Admin
Admin

Messages : 4881
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2009

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Thailande, la vidéo qui démange les biens pensants

Message  Admin le Sam 21 Juil 2012 - 22:26

avatar
Admin
Admin

Messages : 4881
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2009

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Thailande, la vidéo qui démange les biens pensants

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum